Gallery: Goat Town: Solid Bistro Food, Hold The Excitement

Goat meatballs ($11)
Goat meatballs ($11)

The only instance of the namesake animal on the menu, these were dramatically underseasoned; they tasted of goat for the first moment in the mouth, but as you kept chewing, the flavor fell flat. The paired sauces didn't do much to add interest.

Kale Waldorf ($9)
Kale Waldorf ($9)

Better than any Waldorf salad we've ever had, with crisp apples, well-distributed walnuts and raisins, and a dressing that's admittedly mayonnaise-y but not too heavily applied. One part American indulgence, one part happy locavore.

Steak Tartar ($12)
Steak Tartar ($12)

Needed salt and acid—more capers and pickles would've helped. (It also had bits of connective tissue in it, as if the beef weren't quite trimmed properly.)

Chicken liver mousse
Chicken liver mousse

One of the best appetizers. Served with cornichons, grainy mustard, and (not quite enough) sourdough toast, it's very well done: boozy and a little sweet, but with a pronounced liver taste.

Pan-roasted baby chicken ($18)
Pan-roasted baby chicken ($18)

Super-crisp, well-seasoned skin, moist meat both white and dark—though we'd expect a nearly twenty-dollar plate of poultry to be either larger or more original or both.

Sauteed arctic char ($22)
Sauteed arctic char ($22)

It sported fantastic crisp skin smothered in a nicely pungent rouille that flavored the fennel, potato, and leeks beneath; that said, given the softness of the fatty fish, a bit more textural contrast wouldn't have hurt.

Pineapple knickerbocker glory ($10)
Pineapple knickerbocker glory ($10)

Though the pineapple sorbet was quite appealing, the promised burnt honey ice cream was nowhere to be found—or just so overwhelmed by the pineapple we couldn't find it.

Cookie plate ($9)
Cookie plate ($9)

Excellent pecan sandies and shortbread, nicely salty chocolate chip cookies, and an enormous, unwieldy meringue.

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