'korean' on Serious Eats

Namoodol at H-Mart in Flushing Serves up a Quality Korean Lunch

As one of the city's Asian food meccas, Flushing has no shortage of good food courts. But one of the best receives little attention from Yelp or small food blogs, likely for one simple reason: it's a 25-minute walk from the 7 train on Flushing's Union Street in a Korean supermarket chain called H-Mart. Unless you have a car (it's five minutes from the Whitestone bridge that way), Namoodol, the H-Mart's lunch counter, is a trek, but the Korean barbecue and free tea alone are well worth the trip. More

A Late Night Korea Town Food and Bar Crawl

Korea Town is one of Manhattan's most exciting food neighborhoods at any time of day, but it really comes alive late at night, when the crowds build and the soju starts flowing. Some late night specialties on our trip: spicy noodle stew with cheese and hot dogs, stir fried blood sausage, Korean fried chicken, and more. Follow along with us after the jump. More

Hanjoo Brings Korean Pork Barbecue to the East Village

We first encountered Hanjoo on its home turf in Korean Flushing, when our man Chris Hansen lavished praise on its crispy and succulent crystal-grilled pork barbecue. We don't see much of the style of barbecue, a shame given the simple brilliance of the concept: Cook pork belly on an inclined plane of quartz over a gas burner. Let drippings fall into a pile of kimchi. Take delight.

So when another branch of Hanjoo opened in the East Village on Saint Mark's Place, we paid a visit quickly, and yup, there was that barbecue pork again, still awesome. But on our first visit and three subsequent trips, the restaurant has been more than half empty during peak hours. This street is a madhouse at night, and neighboring ramen joints and Chinese restaurants do well enough. So why aren't people going here?

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Hanjan: Hooni Kim's Sophomore Effort Establishes Him as NY King of Korean

Chef Hooni Kim quckly made a name for himself (and a place in the New York dining lexicon for Bulgogi Sliders) with Danji, his slim, swanky, difficult-to-get-into-but-oh-so-delicious Korean fusion small-plates restaurant in midtown. Hanjan, his new "Korean izakaya,"—an establishment meant for equal parts drinking and dining—does more than live up to that legacy. It sails over it, planting Kim firmly in place as the leader in modern Korean cookery in New York. More

Food Artisans: We Rub You

When Ann and Janet Chung were growing up in Texas in the '70s, "being Korean was unusual." So the sisters are thrilled that Korean food is gaining a foothold in mainstream food culture. "When we see kimchi in an American supermarket, it just knocks our socks off," Ann says. More

Gaonnuri's Korean Fare Doesn't Reach The Heights Of Its Digs

A handsome bar and pretty hostess meets you when the doors open on the 39th floor. If there's one thing you can say about it, Gaonnuri sure is a looker. I'm not used to being treated this nicely at a Korean restaurant I think to myself as the hostess asks us if we'd like to proceed straight to our table, or perhaps enjoy a drink at the bar first.

A long-term, multi-million dollar project. Gaonnuri's goal is to elevate the Korean food of Manhattan—figuratively and quite literally—serving spruced up, high-end renditions of all of the Korean classics in a spacious and modern dining room that floats high above midtown, the Empire State Building so close you can almost make out the staplers on the office desks. It's the Korean version of the Rainbow Room, and every bit as classy.

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First Look: Gaonnuri in Koreatown

Gannouri, a new Korean restaurant on the 39th Floor of 1250 Broadway in Koreatown, seeks to offer a fine dining atmosphere but its menu isn't jockeying for space with the new wave of high-end Korean restaurants. In fact, the eclectic selection of Korean pancakes, hearty stews, and meats grilled at your table may remind you of other ground floor K-town staples. More

Slurped: Of Far-Out Korean Rice Cakes

This week I thought I would share with you a story of two very different Korean rice cake dishes, at two very different restaurants. I don't know what the moral of the story is, only that the dishes could not have been more different: one makes Korean rice cakes the subject of culinary art; the other smothers them in melted cheese. More

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