'dim sum' on Serious Eats

Video: Serious Eats Makes Dim Sum at Buddakan

Edamame dumplings and Cantonese spring rolls: breakfast of champions? Yes, and it's called dim sum. More and more frequently, traces of dim sum can be found in dinner menus throughout the US, and we're not complaining. In fact, we recently snuck into a restaurant kitchen to see how the small dishes are made. Carey Jones even made some dim sum herself, under the careful guidance of Chef Yang Huang of Buddakan. More

Queens Eats: Fried Rice Balls Stuffed with Crab Meat at East Ocean Palace

Maybe I don't get around to enough dim sum parlors, but this dish was new to me when I had it at East Ocean Palace in Forest Hills a while ago. It's on the dim sum section of the menu listed as fried rice balls stuffed with crab meat ($12.95). My mother-in-law was excited to see these on the menu, and they've since made it onto my hit parade of must-order dim sum items. More

Behind The Scenes: Making Dim Sum At Nom Wah Tea Parlor

We're big fans of dim sum at Serious Eats and Nom Wah Tea Parlor, on Doyer Street in Manhattan's Chinatown, does not disappoint. Nom Wah has been serving up dim sum since the early 1920s, and many of the chefs working in the kitchen have been there for 30 years—they're masters at what they do. We spent a few hours in the kitchen with all the chefs to see how some of our favorite dim sum dishes were made. More

Red Egg: Great Dim Sum Without The Carts

Having grown up hitting the cart-based gigantic Chinese palaces of New York and Boston's Chinatowns for my dim sum fix, I've never really considered menu-based dim sum as a viable dining option. Somehow, checking off boxes and waiting for your food to come is just not quite as fun as pointing at what you want from a stack of steamers. But the truth of the matter is, the quality of the food you get at check-the-box-and-wait establishments is often much higher than at the cart-based operations. And Red Egg is a great example of that. More

Lunch Today: Dim Sum from Nom Wah Tea Parlor

Tucked away in the corner of Doyer Street, Nom Wah Tea Parlor has been in business in Chinatown since the early '20s and had just recently undergone renovations, which jazzed up the space with the charming vintage look of an old Hong Kong diner. But it's the dim sum that makes it worth a return trip. More

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