'Israeli' on Serious Eats

A Sandwich a Day: Sabich at Nish Nush

You can think of Sabich as breakfast falafel: fried eggplant, egg, salad, and yogurt all stuffed into pita. That pita's a big part of what makes the sandwich, and at Nish Nush in Tribeca, it's made daily. It's light and springy, but strong enough to hold all the traditional components of a sabich. More

Market Tours: Visit Carmel Grocery in Forest Hills for Eggplant Salads and Middle Eastern Staples

Look close under the green and white awning and you'll notice, in the window, brightly painted signs advertising dried fruits and nuts, homemade salads, and more. Welcome to Carmel, a tiny but wonderfully stocked Middle Eastern grocery in Forest Hills. The products are fresh, the staff is friendly, and the affordable prices can't be beat. More

Williamsburg: Zizi Limona and The New Middle Eastern Cuisine

During the Passover seder we talk about four children who each ask a question of the adults at the table. The wise child, the only one we really celebrate, says to the family, "What are these laws and traditions you carry out?" In other words, "what does all this mean to you and me?" So the allegory goes, this is the child we entrust our traditions to. We trust him to keep them safe and practice them well.

Zizi Limona is what happens when the wise child opens a restaurant—or when three of them do. And though chef Nir Mesika and Hummus Place vets Yigal Ashkenazi and Sharon Hoota have succeeded in creating a neighborhood spot that's casual and affordable enough for weekly meals, they've also made something greater. Call it pan-Middle Eastern or the New Israeli Cuisine or whatever else you like, but heed this: if the deceptively simple stuff at Balaboosta gets you hungry, it's time to head over to Williamsburg for a taste of smart Middle Eastern cuisine like nothing else in New York.

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Market Tours: Holyland Market

St. Mark's Place might seem an odd location for a kosher Middle Eastern market, what with its sidewalk vendors hawking colorful socks, spiky jewelry and gothic ware. Then again, Holyland Market—with its Hamsa emblem, its oh-so-New-York history, and Haran, its super-friendly, super-knowledgeable Latin-music-playing employee—seems very much at home among its neighbors. More

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