East Village, Manhattan

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Nick Anderer's Best Eats in the East Village and Alphabet City

As a longtime resident on the east side of Manhattan, Nick Anderer has seen more restaurants pop up closer to the East River each year. The 35-year-old chef currently lives in Stuyvesant Town, not far from Maialino, where he's the head chef, and the East Village, where he lived before. He's discovered more favorites through years that he can keep track of, but Anderer shared his favorites with us this week. More

After 16 Years, Lucien French Bistro Still Has Plenty to Say

Lucien is the sort of place you can go when you know what you want to eat, so long as what you want to eat is classic bistro fare. There's risk in running a restaurant so traditional—the food needs to be articulate and speak to guests in special, intimate ways, less the whole concept prove hollow and soulless. Lucien opened in 1998. After 16 years, the restaurant's got a way with words. More

Odessa's French Toast Forever

I don't remember exactly when I ate at Odessa (the restaurant) for the first time—it was in 2005 or 6, in a boozy haze, probably around the same time that a college friend was bartending at Odessa (the bar) next door, specializing in a variation of a Long Island Iced Tea with an unprintable name (okay, we'll print it—scroll down). I do remember that Odessa (the restaurant) made an excellent French toast, using fluffy challah bread so thoroughly soaked in eggy goo that it became almost like a caramelized bread pudding when it hit the flattop. More

Mee Noodle Shop is Back, But Has New York Moved On?

Since Mee Noodle Shop closed in 2006, New York's Chinese food has evolved. Diners now know that "Chinese food" isn't a single category; they look for Sichuan or Cantonese food in restaurants specializing in those cuisines. And a rush of new options for quality Chinese—Han Dynasty, Hot Kitchen, Xi'an Famous Foods, and even Grand Sichuan—make Mee's reopening far less relevant, except for the gentle price. More

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