Slideshow: 23 Asian Noodle Dishes We Love in NYC

Hand-Pulled Noodles with Big Tray of Chicken at Spicy Village ($14.20)
Hand-Pulled Noodles with Big Tray of Chicken at Spicy Village ($14.20)

Spicy Village's thick, chewy hand-pulled noodles are especially good over the "Big Tray of Chicken"—nuggets of bone-in chicken leg and wings stewed down with potatoes in a rich savory gravy heavily scented with Sichuan peppercorn.

Spicy Village: 68B Forsyth Street, New York, NY 10002 (map); 212-625-8299; spicyvillageny.com

[Photograph: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Boe Thuk at Phayul ($5.99)
Boe Thuk at Phayul ($5.99)

This Tibetan beef soup with thick, soft egg noodles is made memorable by its broth that's rich and sweet but not cloying.

Phayul: 3765 74th Street, Second Floor, Jackson Heights, NY 11372 (map); 718-424-1869

[Photograph: Chichi Wang]

Stir-Fried Knife-Cut Noodles at Sheng Wang ($4)
Stir-Fried Knife-Cut Noodles at Sheng Wang ($4)

Knife-cut noodles are made by shaving thin, floppy shards of noodle off a lump of dough directly into boiling water. At Sheng Wang, a hand-pulled noodle specialist in Chinatown, you can get the noodles stir fried with chili- and Sichuan peppercorn-infused oil. Pickles and a oily, spicy sauce are provided at the table.

Sheng Wang: 27 Eldridge Street, New York, NY 10002 (map); 212-925-0805

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Kake-Style Udon at Samurai Mama ($8 to $15)
Kake-Style Udon at Samurai Mama ($8 to $15)

One of our favorite spots for udon in New York—the thick noodles at Samurai Mama come in big bowls of broth with ocean flavors and a touch of soy. It's a rich, satisfying bowl but won't leave you feeling weighed down.

Samurai Mama: 205 Grand Street, Brooklyn, NY 11211 (map); 718-599-6161; samuraimama.com

[Photograph: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Soba at Cocoron ($8 to $14.50)
Soba at Cocoron ($8 to $14.50)

The soba at Cocoron is everything it should be: bouncy and stretchy, with the distinct deep, slightly roasty flavor of buckwheat. It's served a variety of ways—chilled, in broth, and with hot broth on the side for dipping—and we love them all.

Cocoron: 61 Delancy Street, New York, NY 10002 (map); 212-925-5220; cocoron-soba.com

[Photograph: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Rice Noodles with Shredded Roast Duck and Pickled Mustard Greens at RedFarm ($27.00)
Rice Noodles with Shredded Roast Duck and Pickled Mustard Greens at RedFarm ($27.00)

Take your classic dry-style beef chow fun, sub out the beef for shredded duck, and add a touch of preserved mustard greens and you've got a noodle dish to reckon with. It's just one more case of how RedFarm smartly elevates American-style Chinese food.

RedFarm: 529 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10014 (map); 212-792-9700; redfarmnyc.com

[Photograph: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Noodles with Crispy Meat Sauce at Yun Nan Flavour Garden ($5.50)
Noodles with Crispy Meat Sauce at Yun Nan Flavour Garden ($5.50)

Yun Nan Flavour Garden specializes in round handmade noodles with a subtle rice flavor. In this soup they're contrasted with pork cracklings and brightened with cilantro, spring onion, and pickled greens.

Yun Nan Flavour Garden: 5121 8th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11220 (map); 718-633-3090

[Photograph: Joe DiStefano]

Shrimp Wonton Soup at Noodle Village ($5.25 small/$6.50 large)
Shrimp Wonton Soup at Noodle Village ($5.25 small/$6.50 large)

Home to the best wonton soup in Chinatown, Noodle Village serves a generous portion of springy noodles in a deeply chickeny broth with plenty of thin-skinned wontons. The shrimp in the wontons is sweet and crisp, a step up from most other noodle shops.

Noodle Village: 13 Mott Street, New York, NY 10013 (map); 212-786-2068noodlevillageny.com

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Knife-Cut Noodles at Tasty Hand-Pulled Noodles ($4.75)
Knife-Cut Noodles at Tasty Hand-Pulled Noodles ($4.75)

For some of the best knife-cut noodles in New York, trust the name. Tasty Hand-Pulled Noodles gives you plenty of options: varying thickness of noodle, in soup or pan-fried, and with the protein and vegetable of your choice. We're partial to the pan-fried noodles.

Tasty Hand-Pulled Noodles: 1 Doyers Street, New York, NY 10013 (map); 212-791-1817; tastyhandpullednoodles.com

[Photograph: Chichi Wang]

Ginger Scallion Noodles at Great NY Noodletown ($5.50)
Ginger Scallion Noodles at Great NY Noodletown ($5.50)

The most iconic dish from this late night Chinatown haunt. Thin noodles are dressed with peppery scallions and ginger with a bit of oil, then topped with sweet hoisin. Light and clean but with pungent flavors, it's just the thing to settle your stomach.

Great NY Noodletown: 28 Bowery, New York, NY 10013 (map); 212-349-0923; greatnynoodletown.com

[Photograph: Max Falkowitz]

Pad Kee Mao at Ploy Thai ($8)
Pad Kee Mao at Ploy Thai ($8)

Unlike most rice noodles, these triangle-shaped ones from Elmhurst Thai spot Ploy Thai really do taste like fresh rice. Fresh basil adds aroma, as does the delicate but pronounced charring on the edges of the noodles.

Ploy Thai: 8140 Broadway, Elmhurst, NY 11373 (map); 718-205-2128

[Photograph: Chichi Wang]

Kuaytiaw Khua Kai at Pok Pok Phat Thai ($11.00)
Kuaytiaw Khua Kai at Pok Pok Phat Thai ($11.00)

These rice noodles are most noteworthy for the incredible crust that forms on them as they cook in the pan. The thick noodles have a powerful crunch, almost as if they'd been deep fried on one side, but they stay tender, not overcooked. Mix-ins of chicken, cuttlefish, and peanuts add more textural contrast while chilies bring a welcome heat.

Pok Pok Phat Thai: 137 Rivington Street, New York, NY 10002 (map); 212-477-1299; pokpokphatthai.com

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Buddae Jiggae at Pocha 32 ($26.99)
Buddae Jiggae at Pocha 32 ($26.99)

Buddae jiggae is a spicy stew with roots back to the American military presence during the Korean War. Pocha's version boasts hot dogs and Spam along with a tangle of thick rice noodles, some incidental greens, and, oh yeah, lots of melted cheese.

Pocha 32: 15 W 32nd St, New York, NY 10001 (map); 212-279-1876; pocha32nyc.com

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Khao Soi Kaa Kai at Uncle Boons ($20.00)
Khao Soi Kaa Kai at Uncle Boons ($20.00)

A coconut-rich northern Thai-style golden curry served with a meaty braised chicken leg and thigh and filled with thick hand-rolled egg noodles that have an almost spaetzle-like richness. There's plenty of bright pickled shallots and mustard greens to lighten things up.

Uncle Boons: 7 Spring Street, New York, NY 10012 (map); 646-370-6650; uncleboons.com

[Photograph: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Rice Noodle Roll at Sun Hing Lung Co. ($1.25)
Rice Noodle Roll at Sun Hing Lung Co. ($1.25)

There is no shortage of freshly steamed rice rolls in Chinatown, but the best come from a tofu factory near the Manhattan Bridge. Rice flour batter is ladled into a steamer try and cooked until it forms a single wobbly noodle that's then scraped into a container and topped with soy, peanut, and chili sauces. To get the most out of your cheung fun, pay an extra 50 cents to get some egg mixed into the batter.

Sun Hing Lung Co: 58 Henry Street, New York, NY 10002 (map); 212-962-7032

[Photograph: Max Falkowitz]

Uyghur Lagman at Chayhana Salom ($9)
Uyghur Lagman at Chayhana Salom ($9)

Lagman, the handmade noodles native to the Uyghur people of western China and central Asia, are especially dense and spaeztle-like with an eggy richness. Get them stir fried with egg and beef and tossed with a subtly spicy sauce flecked with dill and notes of caraway.

Chayhana Salom: 1652 Sheepshead Bay Road, Brooklyn, New York 11235 (map); 718-332-2200; chayhana-salom.com

[Photograph: Max Falkowitz]

You want ramen?
You want ramen?

We'll give you ramen. Hit up our complete guide to the best ramen shops in New York for all of New York's ramen scene.

[Photograph: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Spicy Cumin Lamb Noodles at Xi'an Famous Foods ($7.25)
Spicy Cumin Lamb Noodles at Xi'an Famous Foods ($7.25)

Supple noodles, tender chunks of gamey lamb, and a fiery, oily sauce spiked with cumin make for some of the most addictive noodles in the city. The noodles are thick in some places and thinner in others, a textural contrast that works all the better to soak up all that sauce.

Xi'an Famous Foods: multiple locations; xianfoods.com

[Photograph: Max Falkowitz]