Slideshow: Triple Deckers, Meat Tornadoes, and Pastrami Pile-Ups: 15 Enormous Sandwiches in NYC

Roast Pork Club at Dominique Ansel Bakery
Roast Pork Club at Dominique Ansel Bakery

The Roast Pork Club is a beast of a sandwich: three slabs of well toasted Pullman bread and a fistful of incredibly tender roast pork shoulder, left in large chunks with meaty edges that splay open and crisp. If that weren't rich enough, pickled egg and chili mayo add a luxurious creaminess to all the meat, along with a welcome heat that highlights the pork's natural sweetness. Read more »

[Photograph: Renata Yagolnizter]

Open Face Beef Cheek Sandwich at Perla
Open Face Beef Cheek Sandwich at Perla

"Go big or go home," says this meat and egg monster posing as a sandwich ($15), which you can find on Perla's Friday and weekend lunch menu. And by big we mean two fistfulls of fall-apart how are you so tender braised beef cheek, with a brown sauce packed to bursting with meaty brawn and caramelized flavor, an inch-thick slab of crusty bread that soaks up every stray dribble of the beef's braising liquid, two fried eggs with golden, runny yolks and creamy whites, and a heap of excellent fries with delicate crusts and fluffy innards. Read more »

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

The Bomb' from Sal, Kris, and Charlie's, The Sandwich King of Astoria
The Bomb' from Sal, Kris, and Charlie's, The Sandwich King of Astoria

You really want to know what's on The Bomb? Short answer, all the Italian meats and all the American meats. Long answer: ham, turkey, salami, pepperoni, mortadella.... And three kinds of cheese (American, Swiss, provolone).... And lettuce, tomato, onion, and roasted peppers.... And dressing, mustard, and mayo.... And we're probably still leaving out something. Read more »

[Photograph: Adam Kuban]

Potato and Egg on Lard Bread at Parisi Bakery
Potato and Egg on Lard Bread at Parisi Bakery

A potato and egg sandwich at Parisi Bakery costs you $5.50. It is about ten inches long and three inches tall. And it's enormously filling, with tender potatoes and a crisp-edged omelette—if a little light on the salt. But if you ask the sandwich makers to pile two sandwiches' worth on an 18-inch loaf of their excellent lard bread, you get a monster of a sandwich for about 12 bucks, and the salted pork chunks in the bread give the potato and eggs a helping hand. Read more »

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Reuben at Odessa
Reuben at Odessa

What you're looking at is a huge slab of rye covered in fold upon fold of thinly sliced pastrami, a heap of sauerkraut, an especially sweet Russian dressing, and enough melted Swiss to obscure it all in a glistening sheen of whiteness. Then, next to this fatty tower of triumph, is another whole sandwich, just as massive. Odessa serves this sandwich open face—a common thing for tuna melts, but less so for Reubens. Double the Swiss, double the cardiac arrest. Read more »

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Open Face Turkey at Stage Restaurant
Open Face Turkey at Stage Restaurant

Yes, there's a sandwich under that pile—two slices of rye, which Stage offers to toast despite the flood of gravy that comes when you order your turkey open-faced. The turkey—moist and well-seasoned, pulled in large chunks devoid of gristle—is mounded and mounded until you barely see the crust poking out. Read more »

[Photograph: Max Falkowitz]

Slow Roasted Short Rib Panini at Il Buco Alimentari & Vineria
Slow Roasted Short Rib Panini at Il Buco Alimentari & Vineria

Holy hunk of beef, how the hell is one meant to eat this sandwich? A beast of a panino, the inch-think slab of slow-roasted short rib is insanely rich; the copious amount of melted gorgonzola only boosts it. Read more »

[Photograph: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Mile-High Pastrami Sandwiches
Mile-High Pastrami Sandwiches

Pastrami is undoubtedly the king of New York deli meats, and the city's finest purveyors of the stuff have a tendency to stack their pastrami sandwiches ridiculously high. While you could get one a foot in the air at Carmine's, why not go for a sandwich that'll make you happy you ate it, such as the versions at Katz's, Artie's, Pastrami Queen, or Carnegie Deli?

[Photographs, clockwise from left: Craig Cavallo, Max Falkowitz, Craig Cavallo]

Italian Special at Faicco's Italian Specialties
Italian Special at Faicco's Italian Specialties

The Italian Special sandwich ($10) begins as a long loaf of bread, but the sandwich makers behind the counter slice it in half and pull out much of its crumb. As layers of spicy ham, capicola, sweet or hot soppressata (go for the hot), and prosciutto go into the hollowed-out crust, followed by mozzarella, roasted peppers, lettuce, and tomato, it becomes apparent very quickly that the bread sacrifice is, in fact, very necessary. Read more »

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

So Good at Shopsins
So Good at Shopsins

You may have never thought, "Hey, I could go for a double-decker grilled cheese sandwich made with three slices of French toast thickly layered with loads of oozing cheese and stuffed with perfectly poached eggs," but now you will. Get yourself to Shopsins for their aptly named So Good ($16), a beautiful pile of sweet and savory breakfast favorites stacked into a fork-and-knife sandwich. Read more »

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

'The Firehouse' at Defonte's
'The Firehouse' at Defonte's

What do you call a sandwich with too much tender roast pork? A high-class problem. "The Firehouse" at Defonte's in Gramercy is a spin on a Philly classic—roast pork with broccoli rabe, cooked with garlic and pepper but still keeping a bit of a bite, piled in with sharp, sharp provolone cheese and the Defonte's signature: thin slices of fried eggplant. Read more »

[Photograph: Carey Jones]

Roast Beef Sandwiches at This Little Piggy Had Roast Beef
Roast Beef Sandwiches at This Little Piggy Had Roast Beef

While the Artichoke boys cause all sorts of commotion in Pizza Land, the sandwiches at their narrow First Avenue storefront cause a different kind of disagreement altogether—mainly, deciding which sandwich to order. Pulling from two different roast beef sandwich styles, the cheez whizzed This Way (pictured) and fresh mozzarella-topped That Way (roll $5.50, hero $9.50) are wholly satisfying renditions of two Brooklyn classics. Evoking that Philadelphia triumph of pork and broccoli rabe, The Popeye Way (roll $9.50, hero $12.50), comes garnished with spinach and provolone, but the sleeper may just be their The Other Thing (rye $9.50, hero $12.50) stacked with spicy brown mustard, sweet coleslaw and slabs of pastrami that give Katz's a run for its money. Read more »

[Photograph: Dave Katz]