Slideshow: Making Christmas Goose Charcuterie at Marlow & Daughters

Goose this way
Goose this way
Christmas Goose
Christmas Goose
A standard goose weighs 10 to 12 pounds.
Cutting the goose
Cutting the goose
Ben cuts into the first of eight geese received in a recent delivery.
Removing the legs
Removing the legs
The carcass
The carcass
Cleaning up
Cleaning up
The butcher cuts off fatty bits and trims edges off the goose breasts.
Goose breasts
Goose breasts
Goose leg quarters
Goose leg quarters
Making the cure
Making the cure
Christian and Sarah put together the salt and spice mixture that cures the meat.
Applying the cure
Applying the cure
Ben applies the cure to the goose breasts.
Curing goose legs
Curing goose legs
Sarah applies the cure on the leg quarters for confit.
Cure close up
Cure close up
Into the fridge
Into the fridge
Sarah puts the goose leg quarters in the walk-in refrigerator to cure for three days.
Goose livers
Goose livers
The livers from each carcass is saved for cooking separately.
The goose grind
The goose grind
The livers, along with portions of legs and breast are ground together for sausage.
Mixing the grind
Mixing the grind
Christian mixes the grind for the sausage.
The smell test
The smell test
Christian sniffs the grind to see if it's spiced well enough.
Caramelized onions for the sausage
Caramelized onions for the sausage
Caramelized onions join the ground meat.
Testing the sausage
Testing the sausage
Before stuffing all the ground goose into a sausage, it needs to be tasted to ensure proper salting. Christian balls up a handful to make sure it has the right flavor.
Testing the sausage
Testing the sausage
There's a George Foreman grill in the basement to cook the sausage sample. Down the stairs we go.
Taste testing goose sausage
Taste testing goose sausage
The sausage is sliced up. Everyone in the shop gets a taste.
Mixing in the brandy
Mixing in the brandy
Sausage stuffing
Sausage stuffing
Now it's time to stuff the sausage into casings.
Cured goose breasts
Cured goose breasts
Once cured, the goose breasts are ready to be smoked.
Smoked goose breasts
Smoked goose breasts
The cured breasts are cold smoked, which means they're technically raw, but still good to eat as-is.
Smoked goose breast
Smoked goose breast
They can be sliced thin and served as part of a cheese plate or seared in a skillet to render some of the fat.
Goose fat
Goose fat
Skin and fat deposits from the goose carcass are ground and rendered for confit.
Confited Goose Legs
Confited Goose Legs
Coated in fat and ready to go.