Slideshow: Making Ramen Pasta With Yuji Ramen

Salmon and cheese mazemen
Salmon and cheese mazemen
While most of the omakase menu changes daily, Haraguchi almost always includes one form of mazemen ramen. Here, it's house-cured salmon with a scoop of Camembert/heavy cream "cream cheese," herbs, and a dusting of the super-salty fish scale powder.
Yuji tests the noodles
Yuji tests the noodles
Haraguchi cooking the ramen for his signature mazemen. Unlike the housemade ramen in his tasting menu, the mazemen noodles are specially manufactured by Sun Noodles in New Jersey.
Kombu ramen prep
Kombu ramen prep
Haraguchi and Norvell often experiment with additions to his standard ramen dough. Past inclusions have included squid ink, rye flour, and crab chips, but on the day we visited they were playing with crushed kombu powder, which adds extra umami flavor to the dough.
Kneading time
Kneading time
Norvell kneads the newly alkalized kombu ramen dough with her hand until it comes together in a dense ball, about 10 minutes. The doughs typically rest refrigerated overnight.
Into the fryer
Into the fryer
After Norvell rolls out the dough and cuts it into triangles, she deep-fries each piece to a puffy crisp, then sprinkles more kombu powder on top.
Kombu ramen crackers
Kombu ramen crackers
Up close and personal.
Soba ramen rollout
Soba ramen rollout
Yes, you read that right—it's ramen combined with toasted soba (buckwheat) flour, and Norvell rolls it out on an Italian-style pasta maker.
Soba ramen rollout
Soba ramen rollout
The dough is a little dry, so Norvell needs to run in through the machine repeatedly to make it hold together.
Soba ramen rollout
Soba ramen rollout
She folds it up and runs it through again...
Slice and dice
Slice and dice
Norvell cuts the sheets into deliberately imperfect triangles, inspired by Italian maltagliati ("badly cut") pasta.
Grilled conch
Grilled conch
The soba ramen will be topped with conch three ways: grilled conch lip, puréed conch liver, and conch meat confit in ramen broth fat. (Did you know conch have livers?)
Building the bowl
Building the bowl
Norvell drops dollops of roasted corn puree in to the bottom of the dish...
Finishing touches
Finishing touches
Norvell rolls each triangle of (cooked) soba ramen into a cone, and sprinkles some whole corn kernels between the sheets.
Rolling in, close-up
Rolling in, close-up
Here's her technique for rolling the ramen—it's all in the thumb!
The finished product
The finished product
Et viola —the finished dish is as colorful as it is delicious. The grilled conch is mild and smooth, while the confit conch is surprisingly gamey. The fresh corn provides a pop of sweetness against the earthy liver purée, and the ramen cone is precisely calibrated to scoop up every last drop of both sauces.
Mazemen prep station
Mazemen prep station
Mazemen toppings, like bonito, seaweed, and lemon, at the ready. To the right is a little tub of ramen stock fat, which is spooned on (with small spoons!) to some bowls.
Bubbling broth
Bubbling broth
Yuji's broth is made from a collection of leftover scraps and bones from the butcher counter downstairs. "It's more bones than water," he says with a gin. He simmers the broth at under 200 degrees for 10 hours, ensuring that the water never breaks a simmer to retain the most concentrated flavor. The broth is skimmed heavily, so it's low-fat, though Haraguchi saves the fat for other applications (i.e. conch confit).