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Behind the scenes of New York's premium dry-aged steaks. An in-depth look at the aging, cooking, and presentation of New York's premium dry-aged steaks from beef expert Nick Solares.

Steakcraft: The Rib Steak for Two at The Leopard at Des Artistes

Slideshow SLIDESHOW: Steakcraft: The Rib Steak for Two at The Leopard at Des Artistes

The rib steak at The Leopard at Des Artistes. [Photographs: Nick Solares]

Steak Fact Sheet

Cuts: Rib steak
Grade: USDA Prime
Breed: Black Angus
Dry Aged? Yes, 35 Days
Pre-Cooked Weight: 32 oz.
Price: $90 serves 2
Price per Ounce: $2.80

"In the long run it is quality product that is the key to success," says Chef Vito Gnazzo of cooking in general and his rib steak in particular. Gnazzo features a USDA Prime 32 oz. rib steak for two that is dry aged for over 30 days on the menu at The Leopard at Des Artistes, where he is the executive chef. Chef Gnazzo has had an extensive culinary career that spans several decades. He has worked on both side of the country and both sides of the Atlantic.

Originally from Felitto in Salerno, Italy, Gnazzo worked at Antico Osteria Del Ponto, which received three Michelin stars, before moving to Los Angeles and working at the acclaimed REX il Ristorante in the 1980's. In the 1990's Gnazzo was the executive chef at SETA at the MOMA before returning to his native Salerno to work on an exploration of farm to table dining at La Locando. Gnazzo returned to New York in 2001 as executive chef of Il Gattopardo, and later its sister restaurant The Leopard, which opened two years ago.

Chef Gnazzo Slices Steak Table Side

If Gnazzo has learned one thing in his extensive exploration of Italian cooking, it is the paramount importance of letting ingredients speak for themselves. Case in point: his rib steak. "When you have meat that is the best of the best," Gnazzo explains, "you don't have to do too much to it." The che seasons his steak with salt and pepper and grills it simply before finishing it off in the oven. The steak is finished with Himalayan salt and sliced tableside, served with hand-cut French fries.

Take a look through the slideshow to see how Chef Gnazzo brings the steak to the table.

About the author: Nick Solares is a NYC-based food writer and photographer. He has published Beef Aficionado since 2007, with the stated purpose of exploring American exceptionalism through the consumption of hamburgers and steak. He has written over 350 restaurant reviews for Serious Eats since 2008 and served as the creative director for the award-winning iPad app Pat LaFrieda's Big App for Meat. You can follow him on Instagram (@nicksolares) and Twitter (@beefaficionado).

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