Slideshow: Local 92 Does Great Hummus if You Don't Sweat the Small Stuff

Hummus ($7.95 to $12.95)
Hummus ($7.95 to $12.95)
This is hummus you could call chickpea butter: smooth as custard, at once resoundingly rich but light and airy. You can get it plain or filled with a variety of toppings, including cinnamon-spiced nubs of ground beef. The toppings are nice, though somewhat incidental to the great hummus they sit on.

[Photograph: Max Falkowitz]

Shakshuka ($9.95 to $12.45)
Shakshuka ($9.95 to $12.45)
Served in cast iron skillets with quivering eggs ready to flood the sauce with melty yolks. Zvibak uses fresh tomatoes from upstate and canned San Marzanos for a chunky, onion-y stew that takes beautifully to house-baked challah.* Like the hummus, it's full of depth, tangy-sweet. Also like the hummus, toppings of feta, eggplant, halumi, or spinach taste more alike than different.

[Photograph: Max Falkowitz]

Hummus Trio
Hummus Trio
Topped with soft chickpeas, gravy-like dried fava beans, and tahini.

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Pita
Pita
Local 92 plans to make their pita in-house in the months to come, but what they have now is already quite good: well-toasted, thin but pliant and light.

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Purple Babaganoush ($5.95)
Purple Babaganoush ($5.95)
Lightly smoky with a slight tart bite (the dip's pink hue evinces its pickled eggplant base).

[Photograph: Max Falkowitz]

Challah
Challah
Baked in-house, frequently served warm, it's a fitting sponge to mop up the shakshuka it's served with.

[Photograph: Max Falkowitz]

Chicken Schnitzel ($14.95)
Chicken Schnitzel ($14.95)
The crisp, greaseless cutlet, served with crunchy Israeli salad, functions quite well as meat pita in between bites of wheat pita.

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Tabbouleh ($5.45)
Tabbouleh ($5.45)
Made with couscous instead of bulgar, it's lemony, clean, and ever so slightly buttery, stupidly simple, yet a dish I couldn't stop eating.

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Outdoor Seating
Outdoor Seating

[Photograph: Max Falkowitz]