Slideshow: How To Make Real Barbecue at Home with Hill Country Chef Elizabeth Karmel

Elizabeth Karmel
Elizabeth Karmel
Hill Country's Executive Chef Elizabeth Karmel taught the room of eager barbecue fans how to make several of Hill Country's dishes at home, giving plenty of tried and true barbecue tips along the way.
Indoor barbecuing
Indoor barbecuing
The Cameron stovetop smoker allows you to make barbecue even in the confines of your New York-sized kitchen. The wood chips go in the outer base pan, which is covered by an inner drip tray and rack. Always use a rack when smoking meats—air flow around the meat is essential to good barbecue.
Wood chips
Wood chips
The wood chips come in several varieties which impart different flavors to your meat. You can play with different flavors, but should generally avoid smoking with mesquite—the flavor is too strong and bitter.
Smoker
Smoker
Place the wood chips right in the middle of your smoker, so that they'll sit straight over the stove's burner. Once your meat is in the smoker it gets covered with foil to keep the smoke contained. Just make sure to leave plenty of room for air circulation inside.
Rub blend
Rub blend
Her Texas-style dry rub is incredibly simple: salt, pepper, and a little kick of cayenne. The trick to the pepper not being too peppery is using butcher's pepper: it's simply a coarser grind of black pepper, and its heat is less overwhelming than dusty pre-ground stuff. You can find it in some supermarkets, or just crack your own whole peppercorns.
Brisket
Brisket
Don't let your butcher trim the fat away. Fat bastes meat as it cooks, adding moisture and flavor. Place the brisket fat-side up in your smoker so that the fat drips onto the lean side of the meat.
Brisket
Brisket
There's a right and wrong way to cut your brisket. Always cut against the grain so that you see a honeycomb-like pattern in the meat (top and bottom slices). Cutting with the grain makes your meat tough and stringy (middle slice).
Brisket
Brisket
The finished pile of smoked brisket.
Pulled pork
Pulled pork
For a pulled pork sandwich, pork shoulder is seasoned and smoked in a similar manner as the brisket. Make sure to buy bone-in pork butt; when the pork is done you should be able to pull out the bone have have it come out clean (a pitmaster meat thermometer). Once it's rested for 20 to 30 minutes, the pork gets shredded either by hand or with large forks. Make sure to keep any crispy bits of fat and crust (the bark); that's the stuff barbecue dreams are made of.
Pulled pork
Pulled pork
The pulled pork sandwich wouldn't be complete without North Carolina coleslaw.
Pulled pork
Pulled pork
The same barbecue sauce is poured over chopped cabbage. If you have the luxury of time, you should let the mixture marinate for at least two hours, or overnight.
Pulled pork
Pulled pork
Note: in North Carolina the sesame seeds on the bun would be considered a travesty.
Beer can chicken
Beer can chicken
If you want to be really authentic, pick up a can of Shiner Bock, which lucky for you has JUST become available in NYC (I spotted it in Whole Foods).
Beer can chicken
Beer can chicken
Liberally cover your bird in olive oil before canning, and then liberally season with salt and pepper after. Alternatively, you can 'kosher' your chicken by buying it in salt overnight in the fridge, and it won't need any further seasoning. The wings should be tucked back a la 'lounging at the beach.'
Beer can chicken
Beer can chicken
These birds had crispy skins on the outside and moist and tender meat on the inside.
Ribs
Ribs
Barbecue recipes tend to be invented with whatever is lying around; so you can imagine the origins of this sweet KC-style Dr. Pepper barbecue sauce that gets brushed on partway though cooking.
Ribs
Ribs
I want my baby back baby back baby back...