Slideshow: Grocery Shopping with Fuchsia Dunlop in Chinatown, NYC

Getting Directions
Getting Directions

"Where are your preserved vegetables?" Oh, that way.

The Basics
The Basics

Four bottles to always have on hand: Shaoxing rice wine, toasted sesame oil, soy sauce, and Chinkiang black vinegar (similar in some ways to balsamic, but less sweet and syrupy). "Make sure you're getting pure sesame oil, not one cut with other oils. And the toasted variety is more flavorful."

"You can find dark and light soy sauce here. A single bottle of dark soy will usually last you forever; it's thicker and often used to color a dish. Light soy sauce, like this, is more used as a seasoning."

Tamari
Tamari

Tamari is a gluten-free soy sauce, which makes it a good choice for those with wheat allergies.

Cassia
Cassia
Most "cinnamon" sold in the U.S. is actually cassia bark, a more potent relative of c. zeylanicum with a spicy kick. You can find cassia bark in most Chinese supermarkets, as it's used to flavor broths and stews alongside spices like star anise. It's good braised with oxtail and chunks of daikon.
Dried Black Beans
Dried Black Beans

Dried soy beans, specifically. They're salted and fermented into little soy sauce-like nuggets. You can use them for stir fries and braises.

More Black Beans
More Black Beans
Also available in this nifty container.
Fermented Sweet Rice Pudding
Fermented Sweet Rice Pudding

"Oh, you have this! You can use it for a few things. It's a sweet byproduct of making rice wine, and it's used in sweet dishes, such as a concoction of poached eggs and glutinous rice balls in a sweetened soup, a kind of boozy pudding."

This is British English, of course, where 'pudding' can refer to all manner of dessert.

Scouring the Refrigerated Goods
Scouring the Refrigerated Goods

"It's hard to find some of these things in London." What, you mean your grocery store doesn't have ten kinds of tofu puffs?

Dried Shrimp
Dried Shrimp

"These are the shells of tiny dried shrimp—you can see their eyes there. They have a rather intense flavor, and are good for making stock." You can find them in New York Mart's refrigerated section.

Dried Duck
Dried Duck

It comes in a duck version as well!

Smile for the Camera
Smile for the Camera

"The pattern of these fish gills is gorgeous," she says, whipping out her camera to shoot some fish heads.

Stinky Tofu
Stinky Tofu

Sort of the Époisses of the bean curd world. "This is tofu that's packed in a brine that's been left to go off." 'Go off' is British for 'liquid that smells like death incarnate.' "But it's rather delicious when you fry it."

Pictured on the right are other forms of preserved tofu: spicy, fermented, and otherwise.

Green Garlic
Green Garlic

Time to head out to the street stalls. Our first find: "This is a type of garlic used in dishes like mapo tofu. You cut it into horse ears—diagonal cuts—and stir fry it like an aromatic."

Take a Whiff
Take a Whiff
Greens
Greens

One of the best parts of shopping in Chinatown: two pounds of bok choy-like greens cost a few dollars, and they make a side dish almost by themselves.

Fish Shreds
Fish Shreds
Actually whole tiny fish. "Soak these in water and then cook them with eggs—it gives them such a savory flavor." As Ed points out, this is the "umami display" section of the stall.
Dried Oysters
Dried Oysters

"These are dried oysters, and it doesn't surprise me to see them around now [mid February]. They're cooked into a dish for Chinese New Year, because the name of the dish sounds like the Chinese word for money."

Hair Moss
Hair Moss

"What is that," Ed asked. "It looks like carpet."

"It's hair moss, and I guess it does, doesn't it? You can actually rehydrate it and cook it with those dried oysters."

Jujubes
Jujubes

"When these are fresh you can eat them like apples. Here, when they're dried, they're more of a tonic food, and can be made into a tea."

Fuchsia Makes a Friend
Fuchsia Makes a Friend
Snack Time
Snack Time

All that shopping got us hungry, so in we went to nearby Shanghai Cafe Deluxe, our favorite soup dumpling spot in the neighborhood. Fuchsia's favorites: the pork soup dumplings, rice cakes with pork and salt-preserved vegetables, and fish filets and mushrooms served with a starch-thickened rice wine sauce. According to Fuchsia, that fish dish is one of the predecessors of Americanized gloppy Chinese food: some Shanghai dishes are gloppy by design, and New York restaurateurs noticed that the easy-to-eat filets and thick sweet sauce appealed to Americans.