Slideshow: Staff Picks: Our Favorite Street Food in NYC

Pupusas from El Olomega
Pupusas from El Olomega
"Every summer I look forward to the return of the Red Hook ballfield vendors. My strategy is to first get an elote from the juice truck parked at the corner of Bay and Clinton, then eat the charred corn on the cob while waiting for my pupusa. There are two pupusa trucks parked right next to each other: Solber Pupusas and El Olomega, and they're both good, but El Olomega is my favorite. It's also the one with the slower-moving line, hence the elote snack while you wait. Inside the truck they griddle the pupusas, which are somewhere between a pancake and a dumpling, until the masa gets a serious crisp and the cheesy innards are all warm and melty. I like the one with loroco, an edible flower that doesn't taste too floral. The pupusa plate also comes with red cabbage salad, crema, and hot sauce. It's one of the happiest plates of the summer."—Erin Zimmer

El Olomega: Red Hook Ball Fields during the summer (map); elolomega.com

[Photograph: Max Falkowitz]

King of Falafel & Shawarma
King of Falafel & Shawarma
"I love the falafel at The King of Falafel and Shawarma, but truth be told, I love the "Freddy's Junior" plate even more: huge, happy piles of tender chicken and meaty kefta over rice smothered in tahini sauce and glowing orange hot sauce, plus pickles and pickled turnips. And lest you miss the falafel, Freddy will probably either hand you on while you wait, or plop it right on top of the whole platter. An ungodly amount of food for $7."—Carey Jones

"I'll go with the King of Falafel and Shawarma. Even though I haven't been there in over three years, I still have good memories of it."—Robyn Lee

King of Falafel and Shawarma: Southeast corner of Broadway and 29th Street, Astoria, NY (map); also in Midtown; thekingfalafel.com

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

Kati Rolls from Biryani Cart
Kati Rolls from Biryani Cart
"My real favorite street food is my neighbor Freddy, the King of Falafel (shawarma and falafel over rice, all three sauces, extra turnips, please!), but since Carey and Robyn already gave several reasons why the King really is the King, here's my runner up: Biryani Cart, the savior of my Midtown office days. Kati rolls are the thing here, and Biryani's well-griddled paratha wrappers are unfailingly crisp and chewy. $6 gets you two; I usually get the mild and creamy aloo gobi and the spicier lamb buradi roll. The cart is close enough to Bryant Park that I usually take my food there for a sit-down lunch, but I rarely make it there with both rolls intact."—Max Falkowitz

Biryani Cart: Southwest corner of 46th Street and 6th Avenue (map); biryanicart.com

[Photograph: Robyn Lee]

A Very Special Hot Dog
A Very Special Hot Dog
When I was a kid, you could get yourself a good natural casing hot dog from pretty much any street vendor. It was the norm. Over the past few decades, they've slowly been replaced with cheaper skinless franks. This is bad not only for textural reasons—who doesn't like the decisive snap of a good natural casing?—but also for flavor, as that skin helps keep the natural juices and salt inside the hot dog where it belongs. How many times have you ordered a hot dog on the street recently to receive something that may as well be made of tofu?

There's only one single hot dog vendor in New York I know of who has steadfastly refused to reduce the quality of his dogs and still serves up a mean natural casing Sabrett's frank, either boiled or grilled, with the works for just a couple bucks. He is a shy fellow who does not like his name written in print, but if you happen to be on the corner of 7th Avenue and 27th street, do not miss the opportunity to have a real old-school New York dirty water dog experience. Just don't tell him who sent you.—J. Kenji Lopez Alt

[Photograph: J. Kenji Lopez-Alt]

Jerk Chicken and Curry Goat from Jamaican Dutchy
Jerk Chicken and Curry Goat from Jamaican Dutchy
"While I love the Halal Guys, they get plenty of love. What I miss just as much from my days as a Midtown office dweller is the Jamaican Dutchy cart on 55th and 7th (check @jamaicandutchy on Twitter, they move around sometimes). Their jerk chicken and curry goat can't be beat for a hearty, stick-to-your-ribs meal that tastes like it was made with love. Go with the mini meal; it's more than enough for one hungry luncher."—Ben Fishner

[Photograph: Carey Jones]

Kelvin Slush
Kelvin Slush
"Kelvin slush is my pick—refreshing relief from humid NYC summers is no small feat."—Jessica Leibowitz

Kelvin Natural Slush Company: Locations vary, follow on Twitter @KELVINSLUSH; kelvinslush.com

[Photograph: Laura Togut]