Gallery: Post-Sandy, Added Value Farm in Red Hook is Getting Fresh Produce to Neighbors

Task List
Task List

After the storm, the farm organized a series of volunteer cleanup days. Volunteers composted drowned plants, turned soil, and cleaned tools and equipment.

Volunteers
Volunteers

Ian Marvy, co-founder of Added Value, speaks to volunteers.

Turning Soil
Turning Soil

Marvy demonstrates how to turn the farm's soil. After Sandy, volunteers turned all the farm's soil in an effort to expose it to air and help dissipate possible flood-related contaminants such as petroleum byproducts and chemical runoff.

Digging
Digging

Volunteers turn soil.

Best Seat in the House
Best Seat in the House

Young volunteers oversee a cleanup day at the farm.

Cleanup
Cleanup

Volunteers wash out storage containers and coolers.

Clean Containers
Clean Containers
Cleaning Wheelbarrows
Cleaning Wheelbarrows

Volunteer Elliezer Villanueva takes apart a wheelbarrow in preparation for cleaning.

Shipping Container
Shipping Container

In the days leading up to Sandy, farm workers stored important equipment such as seeds, tools and computers in these containers, then reinforced them against the coming storm. On the night of October 29th, Sandy's waters burst into the containers and destroyed everything inside them.

Sorting Garlic
Sorting Garlic

Volunteers sort seed garlic in the greenhouse. Added Value has planted the same strain for more than seven years.

After a Day's Work
After a Day's Work

Rafael Prochnik, 7, and Esme Fishman, 6, pose after a day of work on the farm.

Post-Sandy, Added Value Farm in Red Hook is Getting Fresh Produce to Neighbors