Slideshow: Behind the Scenes at Amagansett Sea Salt Co.

Settling
Settling
The water that Judelson hauls out of the Atlantic sits in these barrels for 2-3 days before the debris settles and is decanted off: sand, algae, small sea creatures—anything other than pure salt water.
Evaporator trays
Evaporator trays
Judelson build these trays to attract as much light and heat as possible, while leaving space for water to evaporate out.
What's left
What's left
After about a week of evaporation (in the summer; the process takes considerably more time in cooler months), the trays hold only large, clumped-together salt crystals.
The crystals
The crystals
At this point, they start to look like the sea salt that will end up in a jar on the table.
Inspecting
Inspecting
Daniel Humm and his chef de cuisine inspect the crystals. (Yes, he's iPhone-photoing it. Thus is the way of the world these days.)
Drying more
Drying more
The salt dries still further on these wire mesh sheets.
Pup!
Pup!
Despite the evident hard work, it looks like a pretty idyllic life out here, with sea air, open skies, and a dog running around.
Salt mill
Salt mill
Judelson built this mill himself to grind the salt down to size. "What I'm actually trying to do is break the crystals," he says, "rather than crush them. They'll break along their natural lines that way."
The finished product
The finished product
Amagansett Sea Salt puts out a number of blends, including the lemon zest "Montauk" and the "East Hampton" Herbs de Provence.