Slideshow: First Look: Lebanese-Armenian at Almayass in the Flatiron

Moutabbal Almayass ($9)
Moutabbal Almayass ($9)
Almayass has some playful spins on Lebanese classics, such as this spread of puréed beets with tahini, garlic, and lemon.
Basterma Almayass ($11)
Basterma Almayass ($11)
Thin crostini topped with basterma and quail eggs, with a dusting of red chili. Basterma is made from thinly sliced dried beef and has a flavor similar to Italian bresola.
Mantee traditional ($15)
Mantee traditional ($15)
Most mantee in this city are boiled. Here, the tiny beef dumplings are baked to develop crisp edges and topped with a garlicky yogurt sauce. Baking thickens the yogurt, and sumac is sprinkled on top for added tartness.
Rue Traboud ($14)
Rue Traboud ($14)
Ron Zacapa 23 year old rum, Grand Marniner, arak, and an unexpected hit of Tabasco.
Sweet and Sour Kebab ($29)
Sweet and Sour Kebab ($29)
Grlled minced beef kebabs topped with a sweet and sour cherry sauce.
Kebbe Naye Almayass ($14)
Kebbe Naye Almayass ($14)
Bulgur adds texture and flavor contrast to a spiced beef tartar. The kebbe are shaped by hand, which accounts for their telltale ridges.
Ashta with Assal ($9)
Ashta with Assal ($9)
Several of the desserts are made with ashta, a kind of clotted milk made from heating milk and collecting the cream solids that float to the surface. This is the simplest of them, a dish of ashta topped with honey (assal), pistachios, and almonds.
Ashta el Saraya ($12)
Ashta el Saraya ($12)
A disk of crumbly, caramelized pastry gets topped with a layer of ashta and pistachios. A slurp of syrup is added tableside.
Ossmalieh Almayass ($12)
Ossmalieh Almayass ($12)
No, there is no way to eat this neatly. Dig past the flossy threads of halva and you'll find a nest of crisp vermicelli noodles stuffed with ashta. Syrup is poured on tableside.
Artwork
Artwork
A glass mobile lining one of the hallways.