Slideshow: 12 Spots in New York Where Tourists Should Go

Torrisi Italian Specialties
Torrisi Italian Specialties
By day Torrisi is a phenomenal Italian deli, serving the best turkey sandwich in town and a chicken parm that's pretty swell as well. But at night Torrisi magically transforms into a gutsy, thrill-seeking, ambitious-but-insanely-focused twenty-seat restaurant where two of America's best young chefs, Rich Torrisi and Mario Carbone, ply their craft with a $50 four-course menu that changes every night. Go by day for a killer sandwich. Go by night to be bowled over by the chefs' skill and creativity—and the almost absurd value of the dining experience.

Torrisi Italian Specialties: 250 Mulberry Street, New York, NY 10012 (map); 212-965-0955; piginahat.com

For Top Chef fans, Kin Shop and Perilla
For Top Chef fans, Kin Shop and Perilla
Not every Top Chef star has gone on to a successful restaurant career, but first season winner Harold Dieterle has moved far beyond his fifteen minutes of fame to open, run, and cook at two incredibly good restaurants in the West Village. Perilla is his flagship, a quietly elegant neighborhood restaurant with a focused, sophisticated menu; Kin Shop is much newer, a Thai restaurant deeply influenced by the flavors and philosophies of that country's cuisine, but interpreted as the chef's own. Dieterle didn't just launch these two spots on celebrity: he's there, he's working, and it really shows in the quality of each restaurant.

Kin Shop: 469 Sixth Avenue, New York, NY 10011 (map); 212-675-4295; kinshopnyc.com; Perilla: 9 Jones Street, New York, NY 10014 (map); 212-929-6868; perillanyc.com

Shopsin's
Shopsin's
Kenny Shopsin has attained some notoriety for his macaroni-and-cheese pancakes (yes, that's mac and cheese in the pancake) and er, his colorful conversation with friends and regulars (expect volleying obscenities as you eat). They've got an endless menu of tripped-out diner food; we love their sliders, their doughnuts, and all sorts of pancakes—or if you're really feeling frisky, a macaroni-and-cheese pancake sandwich with eggs and bacon. It's excessive, but it's not just novelty; the Shopsins can really cook, and their dishes tend to be as delicious as they are ridiculous. But the rough charm of Kenny and family is the real reason there's nowhere like Shopsin's anywhere else in the world.

Shopsin’s: 120 Essex Street, New York, NY 10002 (map); shopsins.com

Taim
Taim
Mamoun's Falafel may be the most recommended (and a little bit cheaper), but Taim's falafel is head and shoulders above any we've had in New York (or, so far, the rest of the country). Wander into their West Village shop (or track down their truck), try any of the three flavors of insanely crisp, fresh-tasting falafel cradled in fluffy pita, and no other falafel will ever quite compare.

Taim: 222 Waverly Place, New York, NY 10010 (map); 212-691-6101; taimfalafel.com

Xi'an Famous Foods
Xi'an Famous Foods
Xi'an Famous Foods started as a small shop in Flushing, Queens, the best destination for most regional Chinese foods in New York, and they now have three Manhattan locations, too. We've never had anything quite like their slippery, chewy liang pi noodles or "lamb face" salad (not as scary as it sounds), all doused in their alluringly spiced, fiery house sauces. Service is fast and friendly and everything's cheap—it's a great place to push your own boundaries a bit (or just slurp down three different kinds of noodles).

Xi’an Famous Foods: multiple locations (map); xianfoods.com

Rubirosa
Rubirosa
Walk through what's left of Little Italy and you're confronted by a dozen checkered-tablecloth Italian restaurants, with waiters outside hawking their menus. But walk just a block or so north to Rubirosa if you want that Italian-American charm but food that's, well, better. Chef and co-owner Angelo "A.J." Pappalardo is straight outta Staten Island, but then spent time in serious restaurant kitchens; he brings that culinary skill to classics like lasagna, thin-crusted pizza, and meatballs. Incredibly good, soul-satisfying, and not too expensive; they do red sauce right.

Rubirosa: 235 Mulberry Street, New York, NY 10012 (map); 212-965-0500; rubirosanyc.com

Motorino
Motorino
We understand why tourists line up at Grimaldi's and Lombardi's, but when it really comes down to it, our favorite pizza in the city might just be the Neapolitan-style pies served at Mathieu Palombino's two restaurants. From his remarkable ovens emerge puffy-edged, lightly charred pizzas topped with any number of delicious things, like spicy soppressata or brussels sprouts and pancetta. It's not classic New York, but it's good enough that we consider it a modern classic. Go. You won't be sorry.

Motorino: multiple locations (map); motorinopizza.com

Keen’s Steakhouse Bar
Keen’s Steakhouse Bar
Not too many places in the city endure without change, year after year. But dating back to 1885, Keen's is a rare piece of classic New York, looking every bit its age (in a good way); the no-reservations pub room is our favorite way to dine there, for prime rib hash or an excellent burger.

Keen’s Steakhouse: 72 West 36th Street, New York, NY 10018 (map); 212-947-3636; keens.com

J. G. Melon
J. G. Melon
There's nowhere in the world like J. G. Melon, an old-timey joint that dates back to the days when the Upper East Side was the place where people would go out. (The well-worn, kitschy decor makes it look even older than it is.) And the classic order is this burger—that's what the crowds are there for. It's an excellent bar burger, well-griddled, juicy, blanketed in melty American, as appealingly lowbrow-classic as the place itself. Be prepared to wait and to encounter gruff service, but that's just part of the charm.

JG Melon: 1291 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10021 (map); 212-744-0585