Slideshow: Zabb Elee: East Village Newcomer is Best Thai in Manhattan

Kai Jiaw Kratiem Don ($6)
Kai Jiaw Kratiem Don ($6)
Try to imagine making a French omelet and doing every single thing wrong, and you're pretty close to a Thai-style omelet. Cooked in plenty of oil in a wok over very high heat, Thai omelets—Kai Jiaw—are cooked through with deeply browned exteriors and a crisp texture.

"These are really authentic," explained Harold. "They're supposed to have this texture—crisp and fluffy." You've got to eat them fast before they start to cool and turn rubbery. Ours came flavored with pickled garlic, though a sweet radish and pork version are also on the menu.

Toam Zabb Kha Moo ($9)
Toam Zabb Kha Moo ($9)
The Toam (spicy lemongrass soup) is a bowl of soup to be reckoned with. Easily enough to feed 2 to 3 people, with plenty of heat and a sour, herbaceous aroma. "I like how the pig's foot is cooked down to just gelatin like this," said Harold as he sucked the tender meat off of a pig's knuckle in the pork leg version. Don't have a foot fetish? No worries—it also comes in spare rib or chicken form.
Kra Pao Moo Korb  ($9)
Kra Pao Moo Korb ($9)
Similar to Pad Ped, but slightly sweeter with highly aromatic, almost medicinal-tasting Holy Basil—quite distinct from the Thai basil that is all-too-often substituted for it. Crisply fried cubes of pork belly retain a juicy, fatty center, while Thai-style oyster sauce adds sweetness and rounds out the complex flavors.
Pukk Boong Moo Korb ($8)
Pukk Boong Moo Korb ($8)
Available with or without crisply fried pork belly (is that really a question worth asking?), stir-fried morning glory is crisp and watery, but not lacking in flavor. It's very subtly seasoned with Thai-style oyster sauce—thinner and not as sweet as its Chinese counterpart.