Slideshow: Fatty 'Cue: Brooklyn Barbecue Goes Asian

Whole Pig
Whole Pig
On Sunday, they throw a whole pig into the smoker, and we were lucky enough to score the pig's head ($40, can be reserved in advance). It was served with shards of crunchy pig skin, green beans, bao (steamed buns) for stuffing, and a delicious pineapple curry sauce. The simultaneously crunchy and moist pig meat practically exploded with flavor and didn't even need all those nifty condiments or accompaniments, though assembling one of those buns did result in one seriously delicious bao.
American Wagyu brisket
American Wagyu brisket
Richter also knows his way around brisket, from his days at Hill Country and the competition barbecue circuit. The American Wagyu brisket ($18) came as beef two ways. The top half of the brisket, the lean part, was still reasonably moist, though it needed the condiments (chili jam, aioli, pickled red onion, bone broth) to really make it swing. The bottom, fattier half of the brisket, the deckel, came as chunks known to Kansas City barbecue afficionados as burnt ends. They were perfect, with a crunchy exterior and a moist, perfectly marbled interior. They were paradigmatic pieces of fatty 'cue, the restaurant's namesake.
Duck
Duck
These hacked up pieces of duck seemed like something Pelaccio serves at Fatty Crab, but they were too chewy.
Pork spare ribs
Pork spare ribs
Coated in a fish and palm syrup, these were flavorful, especially the outer crust, but not all that special ($14).
Lamb shoulder
Lamb shoulder
A smallish pile of hand-pulled lamb shoulder ($18) came with grilled pieces of housemade pita and a spicy garlic and mint-flavored goat yogurt dipping sauce. The lamb was a little dry.
Cucumbers
Cucumbers
Pelaccio has been quoted as saying that the salads are the healthy counterpoint to the "fatty cue," and the cucumbers ($6), served with smoked chili, brown rice vinegar, and toasted sesame seeds, certainly were.
Chocolate bars
Chocolate bars
Made by Brooklyn's own Tumbador ($6), and both pretty good. The milk was made with ginger, puffed and crisped rice; the dark with roasted almonds, chili, and Maldon sea salt.
Shoofly pie
Shoofly pie
Pies are made by Allison Kave, the owner of the online pie company First Prize Pies. Kave won the Brooklyn Pie Baking contest. I really liked Kave's shoofly pie ($6), which was dark and delicious and not too sweet.
Pecan-bourbon pie
Pecan-bourbon pie
The smallest piece of pecan-bourbon pie ever served at a non-Lilliputian restaurant was not particularly special, and based on my non-scientific calculations, came out to $2 a bite.